gradient_bar

How to Get More In Tune With Your Ideal Client

How to Get More In Tune With Your Ideal Client

In any business, a crucial piece of designing a brand and developing products or services is being able to describe who your ideal client is — who, exactly, you’re targeting with what you do.

Once you’ve done that, you can be more focused not only in what you develop/build/create, but also in how you market it.

So, defining that ideal client (or avatar, or buyer persona…) is pretty darn important. It will save you time. It will save you money. It will save your sanity.

But many business owners struggle to really dig beyond who their ideal client is — their demographics, like age, sex, location, etc. — and into what they’re all about — their thoughts, feelings, motivations, and aspirations.

Fortunately, I’ve found a way to conquer that struggle throughout my decade as a business owner: I’ve learned how to put myself in my ideal client’s shoes, ultimately becoming them if even for a short amount of time.

Becoming your ideal client

Let me be clear: I’m not asking you to change yourself. I am asking you to practice a little empathy.

If you’re a store owner who sells clothing, get out and go shopping for clothes yourself. What types of experiences sit best with you? What are your struggles as you’re shopping? What types of thoughts go through your head?

If you’re a restaurant owner focused on offering an entirely gluten-free menu, head out to restaurants that not only do what you want to do, but also those that don’t. What types of struggles do people who need to eat gluten free encounter? What are they feeling when they can’t find it? Better yet — what does the environment look like when they do?

The best part about this process is that in many ways, you’ll realize that you already largely embody your ideal client. After all, many of us start a business because we recognize a need; because we were feeling it ourselves, first.

Here’s how I’ve learned to become my ideal client — and how it’s influenced my business.

What practicing empathy looks like in my graphic design business

My graphic design business has served clients in more industries than I can count on my two hands, but one thing’s been made clear throughout the last decade: I’m at home when I’m designing for the travel and tourism industry.

Once I realized that niche, I set out to empathize with travelers in every destination so I could learn more about how destination marketers could brand themselves. It opened my eyes to new businesses and stories in Asheville. It caused me to better document my travels to Santa Monica when visiting my daughter. It put me in the shoes of my fellow travelers and their aspirations for traveling: to experience that which is unique, to collect stories, and to find themselves. It’s given me a new regard for traveling — and it’s undoubtedly helped me in my research process when designing a destination.

What practicing empathy looks like for my painting business

I apply a similar approach to my painting business. As an artist, it can be easy to keep creating and never tell a soul about it. After all, it’s a very personal thing, to work from your soul.

But expressing that which otherwise might get hidden away isn’t my only reason for painting — it’s to find the people who connect with my light-filled art and are looking to welcome it into their homes and businesses.

To do that — to learn how to find these people and connect with them — I have to actively put myself in their shoes. I love to look at art. I love to buy art. But now, I also love to start conversations with its creators, and their buyers. I love to enter a gallery with others and learn what speaks to them. I love to attend festivals not only as an exhibitionist, but also as a buyer, to get a feel for the experience.

Putting ourselves in our clients’ shoes helps us get ever closer to the things that really matter when it comes to them connecting with our products, our services, our creations. It gives us personal experience with their feelings, their thoughts, and their motivations. It’s inserting ourselves into those experiences that helps us design our own.

Hone in on how you’ll best serve this world

Identify with your ideal client. Put yourself in their shoes in order to develop what it is they need most, and learn how you can deliver it in the way that carries the biggest impact.

Simply put, empathy leads to focus on what you do. Focus leads to impact by doing it even better. And your impact is what we all need most in this world.

Comments

  1. Great advice, as always!

Speak Your Mind

*